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Author Topic: News that concern me  (Read 8159 times)
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games keeper
 

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« Reply #40 on: 2003-04-16, 19:49 »

ever though out of what your made of dicion .
fuell enough .
so we already have 2 out of 3.
for the fire . you dont need it .
in 100% O2 you burn out by yourself .
ever thought about it whu 80 % ov the air you breeth is N2
and only 20% is O2


you only need 2 out of 3 to start fire .
take phospor , burns on its own

and yes evereone smokes here .
exept me
and my family but many of my friends do .
some of them every day others once a month .
some of them take weed.
in that way , yes belgium would burn out into flames .

and caughing up that black ugly stuff isnt right at all .
but i live in a village far away from that Slipgate - Smile
friday Ieven go swimming in the canal. Slipgate - Smile hope the weather will be ok .
(ps if you see in the newspaper sombody got killed while jumping of a bridge in the water that would be me Slipgate - Smile


« Last Edit: 2003-04-16, 19:58 by games keeper » Logged
Phoenix
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« Reply #41 on: 2003-04-17, 02:29 »

Fire is a chemical reaction in which oxygen is combined with some other compound, typically this is carbon where most organic materials are concerned.  Also, you are incorrect Games Keeper, only WHITE phosphorus reacts with air in such a violent manner.  Combustion, and any chemical reaction for that matter, depends on the electron states of the molecules in question and how stable they are.  Combine hydrogen peroxide (pure, not the diluted stuff you buy at the apothecary) and methyl alcohol and you will get a nice fireball without lighting a match.  There are other chemicals that are as unstable as this and when brought together they too ignite instantly.  The reason this happens, and the reason white phosphorus combusts without an external source of energy like a spark or cinder, is that the energy state of its outermost electron layer is already high enough for it to react.  That's all a spark does to light a fire is elevate the energy states of the electrons in the molecules of the fuel so that it can chemically combine with oxygen.  Once an exothermic reaction begins, it provides sustaining energy in the form of heat to elevate the electron states of neighboring atoms enough to cause them to react as well.  This is the entire basis of chemical reactions of every sort.  Some compounds don't even need oxygen from the air to react.  Explosives are one, gunpowder is another.  The oxidizer is already built into the nitrocellulous in gunpowder, and a spark initiates this reaction, which occurs quite fast and in a confined space.  In both cases the resultant chemicals are in a gaseous form which is why explosives and gunpowders work the way they do.  In changing states from a solid to a gas their volume is increased thousands of times in a very short space, but neither gunpowder nor most explosives require oxygen from the air anymore than a rocket engine in space does.  Oxygen is still for all purposes a good reactant, and is used in many chemical reactions.  A 100% oxygen environment just means things can burn a LOT faster, it doesn't mean things will just blow up on their own.  Acetylene gas will burn without oxygen, but combine pure oxygen and it burns at a much faster rate, increasing the temperature as a result to levels that can melt the strongest steel in moments.  It's also of interest to note that the reason living things require oxygen is to combine it with carbon from sugars and carbohydrates to provide energy, hence the CO2 produced from exhalation.  We living animals literally burn our fuel.  Why do you think animal life forms are warm?  I may be reborn in fire, but every living thing is constantly burning, quite slowly, but surely.  Fire is life, remember that. Slipgate - Wink
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I fly into the night, on wings of fire burning bright...
games keeper
 

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« Reply #42 on: 2003-04-17, 08:07 »

Quote
Also, you are incorrect Games Keeper, only WHITE phosphorus reacts with air in such a violent manner
I just said phospor . because have you ever seel how many elementsthere are . and how many have 2 or 3 diffirent kinds .
Fe has +2 and +3
and S has 3 different kinds .


trust me pho I know that .
most ofthose test I did last year when I did
technicial science. or better said everething that had to do with that part (fysics , biologie , chemics , etc )
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Hedhunta
 
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« Reply #43 on: 2003-04-17, 16:13 »

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Combine hydrogen peroxide (pure, not the diluted stuff you buy at the apothecary) and methyl alcohol
lol pho, we were talking bout that with the me163 the other night..hehe
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Vadertime
 

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« Reply #44 on: 2003-04-24, 23:12 »

No Phoenix, nothing burns without oxygen, because all fires are oxidation reactions. Oxygen is necesscary to oxidize anything. The only fires that might burn anaerobicly would be nuclear reactions. I've never been able to take a sample of the sun myself, but whether or not it has oxygen it definitely has nuclear fusion at all times. Here on earth, if you have enough oxygen you can probably light it and burn anything, even solid metal. Just buy a big tank, put a hose with proper fittings on the ends on your tank, turn the valves and carefully put a match to the stream. Then point the intense beam at whatever you need to burn. Fossil fuels and other flamamble materials may explode violently in front of you. Some might burn as soon as the oxygen stream touches them, UNLIT! Still a matter to energy conversion reaction would be the mother of all fires. Too bad scientists can't even control nuclear fusion yet. If only we could keep such reactions contained and collect the juice from them in an efficient way. Nobody would ever worry about electric bills again. Slipgate - Laugh
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